Saturday, June 24, 2017

Beijing: Highs near 38 C to replace April-like rainy spell late week


By Eric Leister, AccuWeather meteorologist
June 24,2017, 12:17:52PM,EDT
 
 
The recent April-like rainy stretch of weather will quickly get erased by a resurgence of sizzling heat in northeastern China this week.
Temperatures will soar into the middle to upper 30s C (middle to upper 90s F) across Beijing and Tianjin by the middle and later part of the week.
While a high of 31 C (88 F) is more common this time of year, the heat will especially be noticed by residents following the recent cool and wet days.
China
A slow-moving storm held highs on Thursday and Friday to 22 C (72 F) as 103 mm (4.07 inches) of rain poured down.
As the storm departs and high pressure settles over the Yellow Sea, hot and humid air will be pumped into the region from the south.
The heat will begin to surge in early this week. The hottest weather conditions will occur in Beijing on Friday and Saturday when temperatures will reach 36 C (97 F) daily.
It will feel oppressive outside much of this week out in the sunshine. Anyone outside should seek shade and stay hydrated to avoid any heat-related illnesses.
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There could be some isolated thunderstorms that fire up each afternoon across the provinces of Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei and Shanxi. However, most places are expected to just remain dry, hot and muggy.
The air quality will suffer due to the heat expected this week. It will be very poor, especially during the afternoon hours when it will be hottest.
Temperatures could fall back slightly to more normal levels early the following week.
 
 

Germany: Weekend cooling trend to give way to strong midweek storms

By Faith Eherts, AccuWeather meteorologist
June 24,2017, 10:35:54AM,EDT
 
 
A welcome period of more seasonable conditions will grace Germany this weekend before the risk of stronger thunderstorms returns around the middle of next week.
The shift away from the recent dry heat was obvious on Thursday as strong storms ravaged the country, resulting in dangerous weather conditions, but also a refreshing drop in temperatures.
Strong winds and reported tornadoes within storms toppled trees and disrupted travel throughout central and northern Germany.
The thunderstorms have been blamed for two deaths. One man was killed in his car from a falling tree while waiting out a storm in a parking lot. Another man fatally crashed into a downed tree.

“Cooler air will follow in the wake of the storms following several days of extreme heat across parts of the country,” said AccuWeather Meteorologist Eric Leister.
In Berlin, temperatures fell from 27 to 17 C (81 to 63 F) in just a couple of hours as storms swept through on Thursday afternoon.
Temperatures will continue to trend downward through this weekend, leading to highs of 17-22 C (63-71 F) from Bremen to Hamburg and Berlin and 24-26 C (75-79 F) in Stuttgart and Munich.
Feature graphic hd24

After temperatures soared to 29-34 C (84-94 F) across Germany earlier this week, the upcoming influx of more seasonable conditions will feel refreshingly cool.
Residents of northern Germany will be replacing shorts and tank tops with light jackets as a brisk wind will create even lower AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures, especially when clouds are blocking out the sun.
Monday’s forecast high temperature of 26 C (78 F) for Frankfurt is above average, but will feel pleasant to many compared to Thursday’s 35 C (95 F).
“The shift to seasonable temperatures will be accompanied by more unsettled weather as well,” said AccuWeather Meteorologist Tyler Roys.
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Showers will dampen parts of northern and central Germany into Monday with a few thunderstorms erupting daily near the Alps.
“The dangerous storms such as those that occurred on Thursday aren’t expected,” Roys said.
Many areas are running below average on precipitation for the month so far, including Dusseldorf, Munich and Dresden.
The upcoming stretch of showery conditions will be welcome by those plagued by the recently dry and hot pattern.
Germany midweek June 23

Shower and thunderstorm activity is likely to further increase toward the middle of next week. As warmer and more humid air also pours in, the threat for stronger thunderstorms may also return.
Worse than ruining outdoor plans, the thunderstorms could become strong enough to cause more damage and endanger residents. The main threat from these stronger thunderstorms would be heavy downpours that can lead to localized flooding and strong wind gusts.
Additional bouts of showers and thunderstorms may follow into next weekend.
 

Southern Mexico to face increased downpours from budding tropical depression


By Kristina Pydynowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
June 24,2017, 9:35:57AM,EDT
 
 A budding tropical depression in the eastern Pacific Basin threatens to increase downpours along Mexico's southern coast into Monday.
AccuWeather meteorologists are closely monitoring an area of low pressure spinning southeast of Acapulco, Mexico.
The low has become better organized since Friday and may become a tropical depression by the end of the weekend as it tracks to the northwest just off the coast of southern Mexico.
Tropical June 24
A lack of strong disruptive winds aloft, known as wind shear, and the warm waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean will make the environment conducive for development.
The low may continue to strengthen into a tropical storm, acquiring the name Dora. However, at this point, odds are low that the system will further strengthen into a hurricane.
“Regardless of development or strength, downpours will increase along the coast of southern Mexico as tropical moisture streams onshore,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Rob Miller said.
How close the low tracks to land will determine the frequency of the downpours and resultant flash flood risk.
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If the low remains a few hundred kilometers (a couple hundred miles) offshore, locally flooding downpours will graze the coast.
A track closer to the coast may lead to more persistent heavy rain, which would put more lives and property at risk for flooding and mudslides.
In this scenario, widespread rain amounts of 75-150 mm (3-6 inches) may target the coast and southern slopes of the mountains from Guerrero to Jalisco. Locally damaging winds could also buffet the coastline.
Seas will build in either scenario as the system strengthens, creating hazards for small craft and swimmers.
Vacationers at the resort cities of Acapulco, Zihuatanejo and Manzanillo may have to make indoor plans for a day or two.
The window for development or strengthening will close when the low reaches the cooler waters off the western tip of southern Mexico on Monday night or Tuesday.
The track of the low and steering winds over Mexico are expected to prevent tropical moisture from streaming northward and enhancing downpours elsewhere across the country and into the southwestern United States.
Behind this low, the potential for another tropical system to develop well off the west coast of Central America later next week is being monitored.
 

Heat to expand across western US as wildfires rage

By Renee Duff, AccuWeather meteorologist
June 24,2017, 6:10:39AM,EDT
 
Record-challenging heat will expand into the Pacific Northwest as hot, dry weather elevates the wildfire risk in the Southwest through Sunday.
The core of extreme heat will spread northward as a high pressure area expands over the West.
A high pressure area is a mainly dry weather feature that can lead to intense heat waves during the spring and summer months. As these features move or weaken, the core of the heat shifts.
“Heat will get supercharged across the Pacific Northwest through the weekend,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Michael LeSeney said.
NW near-record heat 6.24 AM

Sunday’s high will rise into the lower 90s F in Seattle, where a high of 72 degrees Fahrenheit is more typical this time of year.
“In areas west of the Cascades, temperatures will rise through the 80s and into the 90s with triple-digit heat likely in parts of the interior of Washington and Oregon,” LeSeney said.
Portland, Oregon, will approach the 100-degree mark on Sunday. The all-time record high of 107 will be out of reach.
Record highs from the 1920s will be in jeopardy in Bend, Oregon, and Spokane, Washington.
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The many residents of the Pacific Northwest that do not have air conditioning can find relief from the heat in a mall, library or other designated cooling center.
A trip to the beach can also be a welcome reprieve from the heat. Temperatures will be 15 to 30 degrees lower along the coasts of Washington and Oregon compared to areas farther inland.
“The heat won’t last long as an approaching system pushes cooler, marine air across western Washington and Oregon on Monday,” LeSeney said.
SW heat 6.24 AM

Over the Southwest, unseasonably hot conditions will persist into Monday with highs staying 5 to 10 degrees above normal in Phoenix and Las Vegas.
The hot air combined with drying vegetation will elevate the risk of wildfire ignition and spread. Matches, cigarettes, barbecues or outdoor power equipment should be used with extreme caution.
Hot, dry weather is responsible for fanning a wildfire that forced hundreds of people to evacuate in southern Utah this past week. The person that accidentally started the blaze could face charges, according to ABC News.
Major fires are also burning in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. Some of the fires have been difficult to contain due to localized gusty winds.
The wave of more seasonable air first pushing through the Pacific Northwest will finally break the back of the scorching heat wave in the Southwest by the middle of the week. However, the wildfire danger will remain high as little to no precipitation is expected to accompany the cooldown.

This Date in Weather History for June 24,2017 from weatherforyou.com

Weather History
For Saturday,June 24,2017
 
 
 
 
1816 - The cold weather of early June finally gave way to several days of 90 degree heat in Massachusetts, including a reading of 99 degrees at Salem. (David Ludlum)
1924 - Six men at a rock quarry south of Winston-Salem, NC, sought shelter from a thunderstorm. The structure chosen contained a quantity of dynamite. Lightning struck a near-by tree causing the dynamite to explode. The men were killed instantly. (The Weather Channel)
1951 - Twelve inches of hail broke windows and roofs, and dented automobiles, causing more than fourteen million dollars damage. The storm plowed 200 miles from Kingmand County KS into Missouri, with the Wichita area hardest hit. It was the most disastrous hailstorm of record for the state of Kansas. (David Ludlum)
1952 - Thunderstorms produced a swath of hail 60 miles long and 3.5 miles wide through parts of Hand, Beadle, Kingsbury, Miner and Jerauld counties in South Dakota. Poultry and livestock were killed, and many persons were injured. Hail ten inches in circumference was reported at Huron SD. (The Weather Channel)
1987 - Thunderstorms spawned six tornadoes in eastern Colorado. Baseball size hail was reported near Yoder, CO, and thunderstorm winds gusting to 92 mph derailed a train near Pratt, KS. The town of Gould, OK, was soaked with nearly an inch and a half of rain in just ten minutes. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1988 - Forty-three cities reported record high temperatures for the date. Valentine NE reported an all-time record high of 110 degrees, and highs of 102 degrees at Casper, WY, 103 degrees at Reno, NV, and 106 degrees at Winnemucca, NV, were records for the month of June. Highs of 98 degrees at Logan, UT, and 109 degrees at Rapid City, SD, equalled June records. Lightning killed twenty-one cows near Conway, SC. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1989 - Thunderstorms developing along a warm front produced severe weather from Colorado and New Mexico to Kansas and Nebraska. Thunderstorms spawned seven tornadoes, and produced wind gusts to 80 mph at Wood River, NE, and hail three inches in diameter at Wheeler, KS. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)

Friday, June 23, 2017

Is this late spring or late winter? Unseasonable chill has folks in NYC area wondering if summer will ever come

Thanks to a stubborn Jet Stream trough that has been in place virtually all spring,this weather pattern that has been in place,certainly over the last 7 weeks now,has left people in the Northeastern US and the New York City metro-area wondering what time of the year this really is, if Mother Nature needs a calendar and if this'll be the first "Year Without a Summer", in about 200 years (heatwaves like the ones on May 17-19 and June 11-13 notwithstanding). Here's the High and Low Temperatures compared to normal for each day over the last 7.5 weeks for the city of White Plains,NY, in suburban Westchester,NY,as of 12:30AM,EDT,June 24,2017 from accuweather.com








May 1:                70/46           63/45          +7/+1
May 2:                74/60           64/46        +10/+14
May 3:                63/45           64/46           -1/-1
May 4:                61/39           64/46           -3/-7
May 5:                60/48           64/46           -4/+2
May 6:                64/52           65/47           -1/+5
May 7:                54/46           65/47          -11/-1
May 8:                55/43           65/47          -10/-4
May 9:                58/42           65/47           - 7/-5
May 10:              61/45           65/47            -4/-2
May 11:              60/42           65/47            -5/-5
May 12:              61/43           66/48            -5/-5
May 13:              54/44           66/48          -12/-4
May 14:              64/50           66/48            -2/+2
May 15:              66/52           67/49            -1/+3
May 16:              80/58           67/49          +13/+9
May 17:              85/57           68/50          +17/+7
May 18:              94/72           68/50          +26/+22   (Record High Set)
May 19:              90/62           68/50          +22/+12
May 20:              65/49           69/51             -4/-2
May 21:              68/48           69/51             -1/-3
May 22:              59/51           70/52           -11/-1
May 23:              69/55           70/52            -1/+3
May 24:              70/56           70/52             0/+4
May 25:              58/54           71/53          -13/+1
May 26:              74/54           71/53           +3/+1
May 27:              73/53           71/53           +2/0
May 28:              70/56           72/54            -2/+2
May 29:              58/54           72/54          -14/0
May 30:              61/53           72/54          -11/-1
May 31:              75/55           72/54           +3/+1
June 1:                79/55           73/55           +6/0
June 2:                74/50           73/55           +1/-5
June 3:                72/50           73/55            -1/-5
June 4:                70/54           74/56            -4/-2
June 5:                64/56           74/56          -10/0
June 6:                56/50           74/56          -18/-6
June 7:                68/50           75/57            -7/-7
June 8:                72/50           75/57            -3/-7
June 9:                81/47           75/57           +6/-10       (Record Low Set)
June 10:              85/57           76/58           +9/-1
June 11:              92/66           76/58         +16/+8 
June 12:              93/69           76/58         +17/+11      (Record High Set)
June 13:              94/70           77/59         +17/+11      (Record High Set)  
June 14:              84/60           77/59           +7/+1
June 15:              77/57           77/59              0/-2
June 16:              68/58           77/59             -9/-1
June 17:              74/68           78/60             -4+8
June 18:              85/73           78/60            +7/+13
June 19:              84/70           78/60            +6/+10
June 20:              86/64           78/60            +8/+4
June 21:              82/64           79/61            +3/+3
June 22:              85/71           79/61            +6/+10
June 23:              82/72           79/61            +3/+11






-Highest Temperature: 94 degrees on May 18 and June 13
-Lowest Temperature: 39 degrees on May 4
-# of High Temperatures above normal:    23 days
-# of High Temperatures right at normal:   2 days
-# of High Temperatures below normal:    29 days
 -# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal: 7 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal:  9 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal:  5 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal:  1 day     (June 6)
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees above normal:  2 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees below normal:  0 days
-# of Highs at or above 100 degrees:   0 days
-# of Highs between 90-99 degrees:    5 days
-# of Highs between 80-89 degrees:  11 days
-# of Highs between 70-79 degrees:  14 days
-# of Highs between 60-69 degrees : 16 days
-# of Highs below 60 degrees: 8 days
-Rainfall: 8.08 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:       20 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:  34 days

After cool start,June weather begins to heat up as 2017 Summer Season commences

After the persistent trough in the Jet Stream has led to a cool,rainy spring 2017 including a rainy,cool month of May 2017 for the Northeastern US and the New York City tristate area,in particular,June 2017 started out the same way,until the heat-wave of June 11-13,2017 changed the dynamic.Now June 2017 is on pace to be a typically,seasonably warm one,albeit still wet from the persistent flow or train of low pressure systems thanks to the Jet Stream's persistent trough in the East.Here's the High and Low Temperatures for June 2017 for the city of White Plains,NY,as of 12:30AM,EDT,June 24,2017 from accuweather.com








June 1:                     79/55          73/55               +6/0
June 2:                     74/50          73/55               +1/-5
June 3:                     72/50          73/55                -1/-5
June 4:                     70/54          74/56                -4/-2
June 5:                     64/56          74/56              -10/0
June 6:                     56/50          74/56              -18/-6
June 7:                     68/50          75/57                -7/-7
June 8:                     70/50          75/57                -5/-7
June 9:                     81/47          75/57               +6/-10         (Record Low Set)
June 10:                   85/57          76/58               +9/-1
June 11:                   92/66          76/58              +16/+8
June 12:                   92/70          76/58              +16+12        (Record High Set)
June 13:                   93/69          76/58              +17/+11       (Record High Set)
June 14:                   84/60          77/59                +7/+1
June 15:                   77/57          77/59                   0/-2
June 16:                   68/58          77/59                 -9/-1
June 17:                   74/68          78/60                 -4/+8
June 18:                   86/72          78/60                +8/+12
June 19:                   84/70          78/60                +6/+10
June 20:                   85/65          78/60                +7/+5
June 21:                   82/64          79/61                +3/+3
June 22:                   86/70          79/61                +7/+9
June 23:                   82/72          79/61                +3/+11





-Highest Temperature: 93 degrees on June 13
-Lowest Temperature:  47 degrees on June 9
-# of Highs above normal:    14 days         (including the last 6 straight)
-# of Highs right at normal:   1 day            (June 15)
-# of Highs below normal:      8 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal: 3 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal: 2 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal: 3 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal: 1 day      (June 6)
-Rainfall: 1.51 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Rainfall:         7 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Rainfall:  16 days

Cindy to raise the risk of flooding in part of northeastern US

By Alex Sosnowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
June 23,2017, 7:42:41PM,EDT
 
Multiple systems, including Tropical Rainstorm Cindy, will combine forces to raise the risk of flash flooding in parts of the northeastern United States into Saturday.
A surge in warmth and humidity will meet up with a press of cooler air from the Midwest. At the same time Tropical Rainstorm Cindy will move along the boundary between the warm and cool air.
Initially, locally severe thunderstorms will erupt. A few communities can be hit with damaging wind gusts. The pattern will evolve into a heavy rain setup late Friday night.
Some gusty storms brought down trees from Pennsylvania to Kentucky on Friday afternoon before the threat shifted to flooding downpours.
Several inches of rain fell from Pittsburgh through Cincinnati leading to widespread flooding.

Storm rolled in around 3:30 pm. The high winds took out this garage on Brush Run Road in Washington. Ten bunnies in cage survived. @WTAE
While downpours can occur with any shower or thunderstorm throughout the Northeast into Saturday morning, there is a zone that may be at greater risk for flooding.
NE Humidity increase 6.23 AM

"As moisture from Tropical Rainstorm Cindy sweeps through, areas from Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee to West Virginia, Pennsylvania, northern Maryland, northern New Jersey and coastal New York state could have periods of torrential rain from later Friday night to Saturday morning," according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dave Dombek.
Static Cindy Mid-Atlantic 2 pm

From Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City and other metro areas in the region, the most common problem from the downpours will be urban flooding, where water collects in poor drainage areas of streets and highways.
"At the very least, people traveling in the Northeast should anticipate downpour-related delays into Saturday," Dombek said.
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In the heaviest downpours, a couple of inches of rain can fall in as many hours. For some communities this is above the threshold for flash flooding to occur, due to the state of the soil and topography. This is especially true for parts of the central Appalachians and eastern parts of the Ohio Valley.
People should avoid setting up their campsite along small streams or the banks of larger rivers as water levels could rise quickly in this situation into Saturday.
Any downpours that track near Indiana, Pennsylvania, could quickly renew flooding that occurred after heavy thunderstorms soaked the area on Thursday afternoon. Over 4 inches of rain fell locally, which led to dozens of high-water rescues.
One man was killed in Indiana, Pennsylvania, as he attempted to clear out a debris-filled pipe while in a kayak, according to the Pittsburgh-Post Gazette. The pond he was kayaking on rose rapidly after the storms unleashed torrents of rain.
He became stuck in the pipe and submerged by water. Bystanders, including his father, were not able to free him.
The risk of flash flooding will end while cool, dry air from the Upper Midwest advances southeastward as the weekend progresses.
Static Saturday Northeast US

By early next week, it will feel more like the middle of September, rather than the end of June for many people.

Southern Mexico to face increased downpours from budding tropical system

By Kristina Pydynowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
June 23,2017, 8:38:18PM,EDT
 
 
Downpours will increase along Mexico’s southern coast into Monday as the next tropical depression or storm in the eastern Pacific Basin attempts to form.
AccuWeather meteorologists are closely monitoring a broad area of low pressure spinning south-southwest of the Gulf of Tehuantepec.
“The low is expected to organize slowly during the weekend and could become a tropical depression or storm late this weekend or early next week,” AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski said.
The low may develop as it tracks to the northwest just off the coast of southern Mexico.
Tropical June 23
A lack of strong disruptive winds aloft, known as wind shear, and the warm waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean will make the environment conducive for development.
However, at this point, odds are low that the system will further strengthen into a hurricane.
“Regardless of development or strength, downpours will increase along the coast of southern Mexico as tropical moisture streams onshore,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Rob Miller said.
How close the low tracks to land will determine the frequency of the downpours and resultant flash flood risk.
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If the low remains a few kilometers (a couple hundred miles) offshore, locally flooding downpours will graze the coast.
A track closer to the coast may lead to more persistent heavy rain, which would put more lives and property at risk for flooding and mudslides.
In this scenario, widespread rain amounts of 75-150 mm (3-6 inches) may target the coast and southern slopes of the mountains from western Oaxaca to Colima. Locally damaging winds could also buffet the coastline.
Seas will build in either scenario as the system strengthens, creating hazards for small craft and swimmers.
Vacationers at the resort cities of Acapulco, Zihuatanejo and Manzanillo may have to make indoor plans for a day or two.
The window for development or strengthening will close when the low reaches the cooler waters off the western tip of southern Mexico on Monday night or Tuesday.
Behind this low, Kottlowski is monitoring the potential for another tropical system to develop well off the west coast of Central America later next week.

UK: Cooler weekend to follow longest June heatwave in more than 40 years

By Eric Leister, AccuWeather meteorologist
June 23,2017, 11:57:43AM,EDT
 
 
Cooler air will continue to pour across the United Kingdom this weekend, providing relief from the longest June heatwave in more than 40 years.
High temperatures this weekend will range from 13-17 C (55-62 F) in Scotland and Northern Ireland, 16-18 C (60-65 F) in northern England and Wales and 18-23 C (65-73 F) in the Midlands and southern England.
Whilst such temperatures are near to below normal, this weekend will feel dramatically cooler following the recent heatwave. That is especially true across Wales and England.
Temperatures surpassed 30 C (86 F) in parts of England and Wales each day from Saturday through Wednesday, resulting in the longest heatwave in June since 1976, according to the Met Office.
London also endured its hottest June day since that year as temperatures soared to 34.5 C (94.1 F) on Wednesday.
On the same day, temperatures soared to 31 C (88 F) at Glastonbury, reportedly making it the hottest day of the festival's history. Paramedics have treated dozens of festival-goers for heat-related ailments.
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The cooler air this weekend will be welcomed by many attending both the Glastonbury Festival and Royal Ascot.
A moderate breeze will create slightly lower AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures.
"A bypassing depression will kick up gusts of 45-50 mph (72-80 km/h) across coastal and exposed areas of northern Scotland this weekend," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski said. "The strongest winds will blow on Saturday."
UK June 23
Rainy spells will also stream into northern and western Scotland this weekend, spoiling outdoor plans.
Odd showers will lightly dampen the rest of Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and western England this weekend.
"Whilst the weekend will not be a washout, those heading to Glastonbury will want to pack their wellies for the occasional passing shower," Pydynowski said.
The greatest chance for a shower around London will be on Saturday morning. The city will then join the East Midlands and North East England in being largely dry with sunny spells this weekend.
Looking ahead to next week, a turn to more unsettled weather with bouts of rain will prevent another heatwave from unfolding.

Severe Weather Alerts - Dobbs Ferry, NY Coastal Flood Statement Coastal Flood Statement in effect until 1:00 AM EDT. Source: U.S. National Weather Service

* LOCATIONS...COASTAL WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTIES.

* POSITIVE TIDAL DEPARTURES...1/2 TO 3/4 FT.

* TIMING...TIMES OF HIGH TIDE BETWEEN 9 PM AND 11 PM.

* IMPACTS...BRIEF AND MINOR FLOODING OF THE MOST VULNERABLE
SHORELINE AND WATERFRONT ROADS AND PROPERTIES.

September-like cool air to plunge into midwestern, northeastern US


By Alex Sosnowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
June 23,2017, 8:36:06PM,EDT
 
Much cooler air with temperatures more typical of mid- to late September will sweep across the Great Lakes and Northeast this weekend into next week.
"Temperatures will stay below average from later this weekend through the middle of next week," according to AccuWeather Long-Range Meteorologist Max Vido.
Highs typically range from the middle 70s F to the middle 80s during late June. However, as the core of the cool air settles in, high temperatures will be held to the 60s over the upper Great Lakes, near 70 in parts of the Ohio Valley and the upper 70s across the Interstate 95 corridor of the mid-Atlantic.
Static Cool Eastern US Jet Stream

Some areas from the Midwest to the central Appalachians may challenge record lows established as far back as the early 1900s.
Temperatures will dip into the 40s and lower 50s in much of the Midwest and the 50s to the lower 60s along the Atlantic Seaboard early next week.
Static Rec Lows NE

Along with lower temperatures will be a substantial drop in humidity levels.
The less humid air will not only be felt as far to the east as the New England and mid-Atlantic coasts, but also into the Deep South.
The only real difference in how it will feel compared to September will be the strong June sunshine. Where and when the sun is out it will still feel warm, especially in your car.
Never leave children and pets unattended in a vehicle. Heat can build up to dangerous levels in a few minutes regardless of the outside temperature this time of the year.
This push of cooler and less humid air will end the risk of downpours in the Ohio Valley, central Appalachians and the Atlantic coast, following localized flooding attributed in part to Tropical Rainstorm Cindy.
Spotty showers and thunderstorms are likely to pop up around the Great Lakes, since the air aloft will be unusually chilly for June.
Static NE NC Cool Sunday

"The air may get cool enough to allow a couple of waterspouts to form over the Great Lakes from Sunday to Monday," Dombek said.
Small craft operators should be alert for rapidly changing weather conditions.
There are no signs of heat returning and staying for an extended period from the Upper Midwest to northern New England through the first part of July.
"Instead, it looks like the pattern will favor back-and-forth warm and cool days with only a brief spike in heat into the first week of July," Vido said.
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"It is possible temperature approach 90 for two to three days in parts of the Ohio Valley and the Interstate 95 corridor right at the end of June," Vido said.
Another sweep of cool air is possible by Independence Day.
The extensive swath of cool air with low humidity will translate to lower electricity usage when compared to average for late June and early July.
Many people will be able to turn off their household air conditioner and basement dehumidifier.
Most days along the Atlantic coast will still be warm enough for swimming and other summer outdoor activities. However, temperatures may dip low enough to hinder a few swimming days from the Great Lakes to the Appalachians.

7 lightning safety tips if you’re caught outside during a thunderstorm


By Courtney Barrow, AccuWeather staff writer 
 
 When lightning strikes, finding the right shelter may not always be easy. Here are the best tips on what to do if stuck outdoors during a thunderstorm.
On Sunday, June 18, 2017, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) kicked off Lightning Safety Awareness Week, hoping to spread the message on how to stay safe in the event of a thunderstorm.
Thirty people are killed by lightning in the United States each year, according to NOAA's 10-year average of annual lightning fatalities.
There are a number of myths about the best places to find shelter when lightning strikes. It's important to know the facts to keep you and your family safe.
1) Get inside as quickly as possible
The best place to be is indoors. NOAA advises that the best course of action is to get to a safe building or vehicle.
"Staying out in the open is a big no-no," said AccuWeather Meteorologist Evan Duffey.
If you can get inside quickly, do so.
When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors - NOAA image
To stay safe in a thunderstorm, remember and follow the phrase "When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!" (Photo/NOAA)

2) Stay low
It's best to get as low to the ground as possible; you do not want to be the tallest thing around in a thunderstorm.
"If there is no shelter available, it's best to find a low spot," said Duffey. "You'll want to find somewhere like a ditch or a depression."
lightning getty
(bgfoto/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

"If you are hiking a mountain and a storm approaches for example, hiking downhill while you can is helpful," he said.
NOAA recommends that when heading out for an activity when thunderstorms will be the area, avoid places like fields or the tops of hills. The administration also says to avoid tall, isolated trees.
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3) Cars are better than nothing
While being in an enclosed car is not as safe as being inside a building, it is a safer option than staying outside.
Common myths regarding cars and lightning is that the rubber from the tires or the gasket around the windshield keep you safe, but that's not necessarily true.
"The real reason cars are a safe option is the metal shell of your car disperses the lightning around you and to the ground," said Duffey. "While you aren’t completely safe, you are safer in your car compared to outside."
4) Avoid bodies of water
While some may think that water will attract lightning, that's not true, either. However, water is an excellent conductor of electricity, meaning that it can travel far.
If out at the beach, pool or lake, and you hear thunder begin to roll in, seek shelter immediately. Being outside, especially near water, is not a good option.
5) Tents and pavilions are not good options
When out at a park or camp ground, people tend to gather under a tent or pavilion to wait out the storm. However, standing under any kind of open shelter like that is still a risky choice.
"Many tents/pavilions have metallic or at least frames made of other conductive materials," said Duffey, explaining how they're about as risky as standing under a lone, tall tree.
Heading indoors or to the car are still the best places to be in a thunderstorm.
6) Always check the forecast before heading outside
If you know you're going to be outside for an extended period of time, far from any nearby buildings or your car, check your local forecast before you leave the house for the day.
NOAA reminds you to keep in mind that the forecast for where you live may not be the same as the place you're going, so be sure to be prepared in the event of a thunderstorm.
7) Don't dawdle
Another common misconception is that thunderstorms have to be nearby for lightning to be a danger. In reality, as soon as you hear lightning, you should move to shelter immediately.
"Lightning can strike very far from a thunderstorm, so even if it isn’t raining, once you can hear thunder you may be in danger," said Duffey.
Lightning myths infographic


For more safety and preparedness tips, visit AccuWeather.com/Ready.
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Germany: Weekend cooling trend to give way to strong midweek storms

By Faith Eherts, AccuWeather meteorologist
June 23,2017, 10:27:59AM,EDT
 
 
A welcome period of more seasonable conditions will grace Germany this weekend before the risk of stronger thunderstorms returns around the middle of next week.
The shift away from the recent dry heat was obvious on Thursday as strong storms ravaged the country, resulting in dangerous weather conditions but also a refreshing drop in temperatures.
Strong winds and reported tornadoes within storms toppled trees and disrupted travel throughout central and northern Germany.
The thunderstorms have been blamed for two deaths. One man was killed in his car from a falling tree while waiting out a storm in a parking lot. Another man fatally crashed into a downed tree.

“Cooler air will follow in the wake of the storms following several days of extreme heat across parts of the country,” said AccuWeather Meteorologist Eric Leister.
In Berlin, temperatures fell from 27 to 17 C (81 to 63 F) in just a couple of hours as storms swept through on Thursday afternoon.
Temperatures will continue to trend downward through this weekend, leading to highs of 17-22 C (63-71 F) from Bremen to Hamburg and Berlin and 24-26 C (75-79 F) in Stuttgart and Munich.
Germany Sunday June 23

After temperatures soared to 29-34 C (84-94 F) across Germany earlier this week, the upcoming influx of more seasonable conditions will feel refreshingly cool.
Residents of northern Germany will be replacing shorts and tank tops with light jackets as a brisk wind will create even lower AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures, especially when clouds are blocking out the sun.
Monday’s forecast high temperature of 27 C (80 F) for Frankfurt is above average, but will feel pleasant to many compared to Thursday’s 35 C (95 F).
“The shift to seasonable temperatures will be accompanied by more unsettled weather as well,” said AccuWeather Meteorologist Tyler Roys.
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Showers will dampen parts of northern and central Germany into Monday with a few thunderstorms erupting daily near the Alps.
“The dangerous storms such as those that occurred on Thursday aren’t expected,” Roys said.
Many areas are running below average on precipitation for the month so far, including Dusseldorf, Munich and Dresden.
The upcoming stretch of showery conditions will be welcomed by those plagued by the recently dry and hot pattern.
Germany midweek June 23
Shower and thunderstorm activity is likely to further increase toward the middle of next week. As warmer and more humid air also pours in, the threat for stronger thunderstorms may also return.
Worse than ruining outdoor plans, the thunderstorms could become strong enough to cause more damage and endanger residents.
Additional bouts of showers and thunderstorms may follow into next weekend.

Dry, cool air to sweep across southern US in Cindy's wake

By Renee Duff, AccuWeather meteorologist
June 23,2017, 11:03:18AM,EDT
 
 
Areas of the southern United States dealing with the aftermath of Cindy will get a break from hot, humid and stormy conditions by the end of the weekend.
For many areas, this will be the first significant break from heat and humidity since the beginning of June.
The drier conditions will allow flood waters, rivers and small streams to recede and flooded roads to begin to reopen after parts of the area were inundated with over 8 inches of rain from Cindy.
Communities that were hit hard from several tornadoes that touched down, including near Birmingham, Alabama, will be able to start picking up the pieces.
Rain and thunderstorms will soak the Southern states along the dividing line between cool, dry air and hot, humid air through Saturday.
Cool, less humid South 6.23 AM

Areas stretching from eastern Texas to Louisiana, central and southern Mississippi, much of Alabama, northern and central Georgia and into parts of South Carolina will face the downpours, according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Ryan Adamson.
Some of the storms could be heavy enough to exacerbate or create new flooding problems. Localized damaging wind gusts are also possible.
The rain will be pushed southward as a refreshing blast of cooler, less humid air plunges across the region on Sunday.
“Humidity will drop unusually low for this time of year,” Adamson said.
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“Along the immediate central Gulf coast, it will take until Monday or Tuesday before the chance of rain lowers,” he said. “In addition, while it will not be as humid as it has been, it will not be as comfortable as areas farther north.”
Highs will range from the upper 70s to lower 80s F from Nashville, Tennessee, to Little Rock, Arkansas, Birmingham, Alabama, and Atlanta from Sunday to the middle of next week.
Wx pattern next week 6.23 AM

The lower humidity will translate to AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures just a few degrees higher than actual temperatures.
Air conditioners may be turned off for the first time in weeks.
The dry, sunny and comfortable conditions are projected to last into the middle of next week before steamy air begins to return towards next weekend.
Into the start of July, no tropical systems or significant rain events are expected to threaten the region.