Tuesday, July 25, 2017

New York City metro-area forecast for July 25-August 8,2017 from weather.com

Here's the 15-day weather forecast for the New York City metro-area for the period of the last week of July and the first 8 days of August (July 25-August 8),2017 from The Weather Channel's web-site, weather.com








Today,July 25: Remaining cloudy and unseasonably cool for very late July and mid-summer,with a high temperature of only 70-75 degrees.As of 1:15PM,EDT,it's 66 degrees and cloudy,with 77% humidity,in White Plains,NY,and it's also 66 degrees and cloudy,with 77% humidity,in New York City.

Tonight: Remaining cloudy,raw and unseasonably cool for mid-summer,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Tomorrow,July 26: Turning partly cloudy and much warmer than recent days,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.

Tomorrow night: Remaining partly to mostly cloudy,but turning warmer than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Thursday,July 27: Remaining mostly cloudy,seasonably warm and humid with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,overnight.

Friday,July 28: Becoming cloudy,rainy,stormy,seasonably warm and humid for mid-summer and the end of July,with a chance for thunderstorms and a high temperature of around 80 degrees and a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Saturday,July 29: Finally turning mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm for the end of July,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's and a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,July 30: Remaining sunny and seasonably warm for mid-summer,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees and a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Monday,July 31: July of 2017;one of the muggiest,stormiest,steamiest Julys on record,ends remaining mostly sunny,but turning warmer than recent days,as it turns very warm,once again,with a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,August 1: August of 2017 begins turning partly cloudy,but remaining very warm,with a high temperature in the middle 80's,once again and  low temperature dropping to around 70 degrees, overnight.

Wednesday,August 2: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining very warm with a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,overnight.

Thursday,August 3: Remaining mostly sunny and very warm for mid-summer and the beginning of August,with a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,once again,and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Friday,August 4: Becoming mostly cloudy,rainy and stormy,with a chance for some morning thunderstorms possible and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Saturday,August 5: Becoming partly cloudy,but not as warm,with a high temperature in the middle 80's and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,overnight.

Sunday,August 6: Remaining partly cloudy and quite warm for early August and mid-to-late summer,with a high temperature of 85-90 degrees and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,once again,overnight.

Monday,August 7: Becoming cloudy,rainy,very warm and sticky,with a chance for some afternoon rain showers possible and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,once again and a low temperature dropping to around 70 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,August 8: Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy,very warm and humid with afternoon thunderstorms possible and a high temperature in the middle 80's and a low temperature dropping to around 70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Is 2017 the wettest year on record for NYC area? Persistent wet,stormy weather pattern could mean wettest year on record for the NYC area if pattern persists for rest of 2017

Thanks to persistent Jet Stream trough since mid-March 2017,the whole year of 2017 could end up being the wettest year on record for the New York City metro-area if this weather pattern not only continues through the rest of the 2017 Summer season,but into the fall/autumn and the 2017 holiday season (Labor Day through New Year's). Here's the daily rainfall tallies for the city of White Plains,NY for the whole year of 2017 so far,as of 2:45AM,EDT,July 25,2017 from accuweather.com







January 1:    None (0.00 inches)
January 2:    0.05 inches
January 3:    0.53 inches
January 4:    None
January 5:    None
January 6:    0.01 inches
January 7:    0.04 inches
January 8:    None
January 9:    None
January 10:  None
January 11:  0.42 inches
January 12:  0.11 inches
January 13:  None
January 14:  0.02 inches
January 15:  None
January 16:  None
January 17:  0.34 inches
January 18:  0.09 inches
January 19:  None
January 20:  0.04 inches
January 21:  None
January 22:  None
January 23:  0.61 inches
January 24:  0.76 inches
January 25:  None
January 26:  None
January 27:  None
January 28:  None
January 29:  None
January 30:  None
January 31:  0.16 inches
February 1:  None
February 2:  None
February 3:  None
February 4:  None
February 5:  None
February 6:  None
February 7:  0.19 inches
February 8:  0.03 inches
February 9:  0.60 inches
February 10: None
February 11: None
February 12: 0.51 inches
February 13: 0.01 inches
February 14: None
February 15: 0.08 inches
February 16: None
February 17: None
February 18: None
February 19: None
February 20: None
February 21: None
February 22: None
February 23: None
February 24: None
February 25: 0.53 inches
February 26: None
February 27: None
February 28: None
March 1:       0.35 inches
March 2:       0.01 inches
March 3:       None
March 4:       None
March 5:       None
March 6:       None
March 7:       0.04 inches
March 8:       0.04 inches
March 9:       None
March 10:     0.11 inches
March 11:     None
March 12:     None
March 13:     None
March 14:     0.98 inches
March 15:     None
March 16:     None
March 17:     None
March 18:     0.01 inches
March 19:     None
March 20:     None
March 21:     None
March 22:     None
March 23:     None
March 24:     0.01 inches
March 25:     0.03 inches
March 26:     0.07 inches
March 27:     0.42 inches
March 28:     0.67 inches
March 29:     None
March 30:     None
March 31:     1.01 inches
April 1:         0.02 inches
April 2:         None
April 3:         0.01 inches
April 4:         1.28 inches
April 5:         None
April 6:         0.99 inches
April 7:         0.01 inches
April 8:         None
April 9:         None
April 10:       None
April 11:       None
April 12:       0.06 inches
April 13:       None
April 14:       None
April 15:       None
April 16:       0.02 inches
April 17:       None
April 18:       None
April 19:       0.16 inches
April 20:       0.15 inches
April 21:       0.29 inches
April 22:       0.04 inches
April 23:       None
April 24:       None
April 25:       0.56 inches
April 26:       0.19 inches
April 27:       0.01 inches
April 28:       0.02 inches
April 29:       0.02 inches
April 30:       None
May 1:          None
May 2:          None
May 3:          None
May 4:          None
May 5:          2.21 inches
May 6:          0.13 inches
May 7:          0.03 inches
May 8:          None
May 9:          None
May 10:        None
May 11:        None
May 12:        None
May 13:        1.60 inches
May 14:        None
May 15:        None
May 16:        None
May 17:        None
May 18:        None
May 19:        0.10 inches
May 20:        None
May 21:        None
May 22:        0.48 inches
May 23:        None
May 24:        0.02 inches
May 25:        0.72 inches
May 26:        0.74 inches
May 27:        None
May 28:        None
May 29:        0.15 inches
May 30:        0.04 inches
May 31:        0.27 inches
June 1:          None
June 2:          None
June 3:          None
June 4:          0.20 inches
June 5:          0.01 inches
June 6:          0.10 inches
June 7:          None
June 8:          None
June 9:          None
June 10:        None
June 11:        None
June 12:        None
June 13:        None
June 14:        None
June 15:        None
June 16:        0.28 inches
June 17:        0.15 inches
June 18:        None
June 19:        0.50 inches
June 20:        None
June 21:        None
June 22:        None
June 23:        0.06 inches
June 24:        0.45 inches
June 25:        None
June 26:        None
June 27:        0.16 inches
June 28:        None
June 29:        None
June 30:        0.08 inches
July 1:           0.15 inches
July 2:           None
July 3:           None
July 4:           None
July 5:           None
July 6:           None
July 7:           1.13 inches
July 8:           0.03 inches
July 9:           None
July 10:         0.02 inches
July 11:         0.23 inches
July 12:         None
July 13:         0.63 inches
July 14:         0.85 inches
July 15:         None
July 16:         None
July 17:         None
July 18:         None
July 19:         None
July 20:         None
July 21:         None
July 22:         None
July 23:         0.02 inches
July 24:         0.46 inches






-Rainfall: 24.74 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:        80 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation: 125 days
-Most Rainfall in one day so far this year: 2.21 inches on May 5

Stormy,persistent weather pattern bleeding into a fourth straight month of soggy,deary weather for NYC area

Since the Spring 2017 season began,practically,the Jet Stream has been practically stuck in a pattern that has let the Eastern two-thirds of the US remain wet,stormy,raw and cool,although now that the 2017 Summer season has began,that may mean we here in the Northeastern US and the New York City area in particular are in for a stormy,soggy,steamy summer this year. Here's the High and Low Temperature and weather stats for the city of White Plains,NY for each day since April Fool's Day; April 1,2017,as of 2:30AM,EDT,July 25,2017 from weatherunderground.com







April 1:                    46/36          50/34               -4/+2
April 2:                    61/37          51/35             +10/+2
April 3:                    64/36          51/35             +13/+1
April 4:                    50/44          52/36               -2/+8
April 5:                    60/42          52/36               +8/+6
April 6:                    51/39          53/35                -2/+4
April 7:                    49/39          54/36                -5/+3
April 8:                    54/38          54/36                 0/+2
April 9:                    67/33          55/37              +12/-4
April 10:                  73/41          55/37              +18/+4
April 11:                  78/48          56/38              +22/+10
April 12:                  72/52          56/38              +16/+14
April 13:                  62/44          57/39                 +5/+5
April 14:                  63/41          57/39                 +6/+2
April 15:                  60/40          58/40                 +2/0
April 16:                  85/51          58/40              +27/+11
April 17:                  70/54          59/41              +11/+13
April 18:                  63/45          59/41                +4/+4
April 19:                  53/41          59/41                 -6/0
April 20:                  66/46          60/42                +6/+4
April 21:                  52/48          60/42                -8/+6
April 22:                  56/46          60/42                -4/+4
April 23:                  65/43          61/43                +4/0
April 24:                  62/40          61/43                +1/-3
April 25:                  56/50          61/43                -5/+7
April 26:                  63/53          62/44                +1/+9
April 27:                  67/57          62/44                +5/+13
April 28:                  83/57          62/44              +21/+13
April 29:                  84/62          63/45              +21/+17
April 30:                  64/48          63/45                 +1/+3
May 1:                     70/46          63/45                +7/+1
May 2:                     74/60          64/46              +10/+14
May 3:                     63/45          64/46                 -1/-1
May 4:                     61/39          64/46                 -3/-7
May 5:                     60/48          64/46                 -4/+2
May 6:                     64/52          65/47                 -1/+5
May 7:                     54/46          65/47                -11/-1
May 8:                     55/43          65/47                -10/-4
May 9:                     58/42          65/47                 - 7/-5
May 10:                   61/45          65/47                  -4/-2
May 11:                   60/42          65/47                  -5/-5
May 12:                   61/43          66/48                  -5/-5
May 13:                   54/44          66/48                -12/-4
May 14:                   64/50          66/48                 -2/+2
May 15:                   66/52          66/48                   0/+4
May 16:                   77/55          67/49               +10/+6
May 17:                   85/57          67/49               +18/+8
May 18:                   95/71          67/49               +28/+22       (Record High Set)
May 19:                   90/62          68/50               +22/+12
May 20:                   66/48          68/50                  -2/-2
May 21:                   67/47          68/50                  -1/-3
May 22:                   59/51          69/51                -10/0
May 23:                   70/54          69/51                 +1/+3
May 24:                   70/56          70/52                   0/+4
May 25:                   58/54          71/53               -13/+1
May 26:                   74/54          71/53                +3/+1
May 27:                   73/53          71/53                +2/0
May 28:                   70/56          72/54                -2/+2
May 29:                   57/53          72/54               -15/-1
May 30:                   60/54          72/54               -12/0
May 31:                   75/55          72/54               +3/+1
June 1:                    79/55          73/55               +6/0
June 2:                    74/50          73/55               +1/-5
June 3:                    72/50          73/55                -1/-5
June 4:                    70/54          74/56                -4/-2
June 5:                    64/56          74/56              -10/0
June 6:                    56/50          74/56              -18/-6
June 7:                    68/50          75/57                -7/-7
June 8:                    70/50          75/57                -5/-7
June 9:                    81/47          75/57               +6/-10          (Record Low Set)
June 10:                  85/57          76/58               +9/-1
June 11:                  92/66          76/58             +16/+8
June 12:                  93/69          76/58             +17/+11          (Record High Set)
June 13:                  94/70          77/59             +17/+11          (Record High Set)
June 14:                  85/59          77/59               +8/0
June 15:                  77/57          77/59                 0/-2
June 16:                  68/58          77/59                -9/-1
June 17:                  74/68          78/60                -4/+8
June 18:                  86/72          78/60               +8/+12
June 19:                  84/70          78/60               +6/+10
June 20:                  85/65          78/60               +7/+5
June 21:                  82/64           79/61              +3/+3
June 22:                  85/71           79/61              +6/+10
June 23:                  82/72           79/61              +3/+11
June 24:                  82/72           80/62              +2/+10
June 25:                  81/63           80/62              +1/+1
June 26:                  78/58           80/62                -2/-4
June 27:                  79/59           80/62                -1/-3
June 28:                  79/57           81/63                -2/-6
June 29:                  82/68           81/63               +1/+5
June 30:                  87/69           81/63               +6/+6
July 1:                     84/68           81/63                +3/+5    
July 2:                     88/70           81/63                +7/+7      
July 3:                     87/67           81/63                +6/+4
July 4:                     85/65           81/63                +4/+2
July 5:                     84/66           82/64                +2/+2  
July 6:                     78/64           82/64                 -4/0
July 7:                     80/66           82/64                 -2/+2
July 8:                     84/66           82/64                +2/+2
July 9:                     81/63           82/64                 -1/-1
July 10:                   84/62           82/64                +2/-2
July 11:                   83/71           82/64                +1/+7
July 12:                   88/72           82/64                +6/+8
July 13:                   90/70           83/65                +7/+5
July 14:                   66/62           83/65                -17/-3
July 15:                   82/64           83/65                 -1/-1
July 16:                   84/64           83/65                 +1/-1
July 17:                   82/66           83/65                 -1/+1
July 18:                   86/70           83/65                 +3/+5
July 19:                   92/72           83/65                 +9/+7
July 20:                   92/72           83/65                 +9/+7
July 21:                   91/75           82/64                 +9/+11
July 22:                   84/72           82/64                 +2/+8
July 23:                   78/68           82/64                  -4/+4
July 24:                   69/61           82/64                -13/-3        




-Highest Temperature: 95 degrees on May 18
-Lowest Temperature:  33 degrees on April 9
-# of Highs above normal:   65 days
-# of Highs right at normal:  4 days
-# of Highs below normal:   45 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal: 18 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal: 11 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal: 12 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal:  3 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees above normal:  6 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees below normal:  0 days
-# of Highs at least 25 degrees above normal:  2 days
-# of Highs at least 25 degrees below normal:  0 days
-Rainfall: 15.9 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:       48 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:  66 days

Avoid a trip to the ER on your summer vacation with these expert tips

By Ashley Williams, AccuWeather staff writer 
 
The last place you'd expect to land during a relaxing summer getaway is in the emergency room, but according to a national survey, it happens more often than we think.
According to a recent survey from Orlando Health, one in four travelers will wind up adding an ER visit to their vacation destinations.
“Most of our visits from tourists are the routine kind of things people suffer from at home," said Dr. Steven Corbett, an emergency medicine physician at Orlando Health’s Dr. P. Phillips Hospital, which has one of the busiest emergency rooms in the country.
[However,] we do see a lot of things that are related to activities they perhaps don’t participate in at home,” he said.
Girl with broken arm in hospital
(Photo/asiseeit/Getty Images)

The types of illnesses and injuries that befall tourists range anywhere from food and alcohol overindulgence to aggravated allergies.
“There are pollens, plants and exposures that people don’t have at home,” Corbett said.
Sun overexposure also lands many visitors in the hospital. Corbett said bad sunburn often brings many foreign visitors to his ER.
“We do [see a rise in ER visits] with summer vacation and kids out of school doing all kinds of activities outside,” said Dr. Jason Eppler, the chairman and medical director of department of emergency services at Research Medical Center in Kansas City, Missouri.
Cuts, scrapes and broken bones resulting from slips and falls are all too common among children, especially near wet pool areas. Corbett cautioned that parents be vigilant when taking kids for a swim to prevent tragedies.
“We’ve seen children who have been unobserved and even drowning and near-drowning accidents," he said.
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Many tourists end up sick or hurt simply due to lack of preparation. What may appear to be common-sense tasks might slip under the radar during the excitement of planning a vacation.
“It seems like it’s always just a frantic thing to get your plans and your packing done," Eppler said. "I don’t think people really take into account that they could encounter a medical emergency."
Orlando Health experts recommended a few tips for families to keep in mind in for developing an emergency preparedness plan.
These include getting travel insurance if you’re leaving the country, since Medicare and some private plans won’t cover medical expenses incurred abroad, bringing photos of essential prescription medications and filling those prescriptions before departing.
Experts also suggested packing medications in carry-on luggage in case bags get lost in transit.
Corbett recommended that people with significant medical conditions keep records of important medical information handy, adding that people often assume that gathering records from another hospital while out of town is a simple task.
Emergency room sign
(Photo/ymgerman/Getty Images)

“Heart patients, for instance, to bring an EKG and a summary of your most recent hospital stay is very helpful,” he said.
Knowing where the closest emergency rooms and urgent care centers are located will help avoid a frantic last-minute search for a facility in an unfamiliar place, said Eppler.
Eppler also recommended keeping healthy snacks available, especially for children, and remaining adequately hydrated.
“A thing that people don’t realize is that a lot of heat illness can arise and people can dehydrate without adequate salt and electrolyte intake,” he added.
Corbett and Eppler recommended taking it easy on alcoholic beverages, which can lead to further dehydration.
Setting ground rules with children before the vacation starts can go a long way in preventing accidents, Corbett suggested.
He also advised that fatigued parents get enough rest and avoid stress to prevent auto accidents and other injuries.

For more safety and preparedness tips, visit AccuWeather.com/Ready.
AccuWeather ready logo
 

New tropical threat in West Pacific may impact Philippines, Taiwan


By Eric Leister, AccuWeather meteorologist
July 25,2017, 11:09:58AM,EDT
 
 An area of showers and thunderstorms to the east of the Philippines will drift northward through the middle of the week and is expected to become the next tropical system in the West Pacific.
If the budding system reaches tropical storm strength, it will be given the name Nesat and become the fifth named storm in the basin within a week's time.
Locations from the northern Philippines to Taiwan should be on alert for potential impacts this week ranging from flooding rainfall and mudslides to damaging winds.
Wpac 7/25

The biggest concern across the Philippines will be heavy rainfall as the developing cyclone passes east of Luzon this week.
This will create a strong easterly flow, pulling ample moisture into the island and causing torrential downpours from Wednesday into this weekend.
Flash flooding and mudslides will be possible across Luzon with an increased risk each day as downpours continue over the same areas.
The threats for Taiwan are less clear and will be dependent on development, strength and track of this potential cyclone.
“Taiwan appears to be the most likely location to see impacts from this potential cyclone,” AccuWeather Meteorologist Adam Douty said.
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These impacts would likely occur any time from Friday night through the weekend.
Another scenario would have the cyclone continuing on a northerly track which would keep any significant impacts to the east of Taiwan.
"Despite some uncertainty in its eventual track, there is higher confidence that this developing tropical threat will eventually strengthen into a tropical storm or potentially a typhoon," said Douty.
Elsewhere in the basin, Tropical Storm Sonca made landfall in central Vietnam early Tuesday afternoon, local time.
Flash flooding will be the main concern with areas from central Vietnam into northern Thailand at greatest risk. More than 100 mm (4 inches) of rain fell in Hue, Vietnam, as the storm made landfall north of the city.
There will also be a heighten risk for mudslides as rain of 75-150 mm (3-6 inches) falls across the region into Wednesday.
Typhoon Noru became the first typhoon of the season on Sunday. However, the storm is expected to remain well east of Japan this week with no impacts to land.

Will America be next to phase out gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles?

By Jillian MacMath, AccuWeather staff writer
July 25,2017, 10:29:51AM,EDT
 
 
In an effort to meet the agreements of the Paris climate accord, the French government has announced the country will ban the sale of gasoline and diesel vehicles by 2040.
They are one of several European countries which have taken strides to reduce their carbon footprint through the ban of vehicles which burn fossil fuels.
Norway, which has the greatest concentration of electric cars globally, aims to allow the sale of only all-electric and plug-in hybrid cars by 2025.
Meanwhile, the Netherlands and parts of Germany are considering a 2025 and 2030 phaseout, respectively.
However, the United States has made no such country-wide declaration to cut ties with fossil fuels, despite nine states taking matters into their own hands and introducing zero-emissions plans.
So, does the U.S. government plan to follow suit?
driverless car
Uber employees test a self-driving Ford Fusion hybrid car, in Pittsburgh on Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. After taking millions of factory jobs, robots could be coming for a new class of worker: people who drive for a living. (AP Photo/Jared Wickerham, File)

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), it’s not in the cards.
“Since 1970 in the U.S. under the Clean Air Act, air pollution has been reduced by about 70 percent, while the economy has grown threefold,” an EPA spokesperson said.
“Other than phasing out lead in gasoline in the 70s and early 80s, there has been no need to 'ban' any type of vehicle or fuel, nor do we foresee a need to do so in the future,” they said.
Steady progress in reducing air pollution and advancements in pollution control technology has made this unnecessary, they said.
“Bottom line – U.S. vehicles have been able to carry us more miles and do more work while getting steadily cleaner and more efficient over time. Through continued innovation, we expect this trend to continue well into the future.”
Legislation or not, car makers are taking the initiative to appeal to buyers’ green interests.
In July, Volvo announced it would produce only electric and hybrid vehicles from 2019 onward.
“This announcement marks the end of the solely combustion engine-powered car,” President and Chief Executive HÃ¥kan Samuelsson said.
While Volvo is one of few automakers to publicly commit to this, experts say it makes little difference; electric-only cars are coming, ready or not.
Tony Seba, a Stanford University economist and author of Rethinking Transportation, told the Guardian: “Banning sales of diesel and gasoline vehicles by 2040 is a bit like banning sales of horses for road transportation by 2040: there won’t be any to ban.”
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RELA
Seba forecasts that, globally, cars, buses and trucks will no longer run on fossil fuels within the next eight years.
Instead, electricity-powered land transport will take over, signaling the downfall of the petroleum industry altogether.
“One of the key findings in Rethinking Transportation is that the whole internal combustion engine automobile value chain will collapse within three years of the approval of autonomous vehicles,” he said.
“That is, if autonomous vehicles are approved in 2021, then new [internal combustion engine] vehicle sales are finished by 2024.”
For economic reason alone, Seba predicts autonomous electric vehicles will take over, complete with a 500,000-mile vehicle lifetimes and far lower maintenance, energy, and insurance costs.

Persistent, unrelenting weather pattern has the NYC area persistently soggy and cool (relative to normal)

Thanks to a stubborn Jet Stream trough that has been in place virtually all spring and now into the summer,looks like the Northeastern US and the New York City metro-area,in particular,is in for one steamy,soggy,stormy summer of 2017.Here's the High and Low Temperatures compared to normal for each day since May 1,2017,for the city of White Plains,NY, in suburban Westchester,NY,as of 1:30AM,EDT,July 25,2017 from accuweather.com







May 1:                70/46           63/45          +7/+1
May 2:                74/60           64/46        +10/+14
May 3:                63/45           64/46           -1/-1
May 4:                61/39           64/46           -3/-7
May 5:                60/48           64/46           -4/+2
May 6:                64/52           65/47           -1/+5
May 7:                54/46           65/47          -11/-1
May 8:                55/43           65/47          -10/-4
May 9:                58/42           65/47           - 7/-5
May 10:              61/45           65/47            -4/-2
May 11:              60/42           65/47            -5/-5
May 12:              61/43           66/48            -5/-5
May 13:              54/44           66/48          -12/-4
May 14:              64/50           66/48            -2/+2
May 15:              66/52           67/49            -1/+3
May 16:              80/58           67/49          +13/+9
May 17:              85/57           68/50          +17/+7
May 18:              94/72           68/50          +26/+22   (Record High Set)
May 19:              90/62           68/50          +22/+12
May 20:              65/49           69/51             -4/-2
May 21:              68/48           69/51             -1/-3
May 22:              59/51           70/52           -11/-1
May 23:              69/55           70/52            -1/+3
May 24:              70/56           70/52             0/+4
May 25:              58/54           71/53          -13/+1
May 26:              74/54           71/53           +3/+1
May 27:              73/53           71/53           +2/0
May 28:              70/56           72/54            -2/+2
May 29:              58/54           72/54          -14/0
May 30:              61/53           72/54          -11/-1
May 31:              75/55           72/54           +3/+1
June 1:                79/55           73/55           +6/0
June 2:                74/50           73/55           +1/-5
June 3:                72/50           73/55            -1/-5
June 4:                70/54           74/56            -4/-2
June 5:                64/56           74/56          -10/0
June 6:                56/50           74/56          -18/-6
June 7:                68/50           75/57            -7/-7
June 8:                72/50           75/57            -3/-7
June 9:                81/47           75/57           +6/-10       (Record Low Set)
June 10:              85/57           76/58           +9/-1
June 11:              92/66           76/58         +16/+8 
June 12:              93/69           76/58         +17/+11      (Record High Set)
June 13:              94/70           77/59         +17/+11      (Record High Set)  
June 14:              84/60           77/59           +7/+1
June 15:              77/57           77/59              0/-2
June 16:              68/58           77/59             -9/-1
June 17:              74/68           78/60             -4+8
June 18:              85/73           78/60            +7/+13
June 19:              84/70           78/60            +6/+10
June 20:              86/64           78/60            +8/+4
June 21:              82/64           79/61            +3/+3
June 22:              85/71           79/61            +6/+10
June 23:              82/72           79/61            +3/+11
June 24:              82/72           80/62            +2/+10
June 25:              81/63           80/62            +1/+1
June 26:              78/58           80/62             -2/-4
June 27:              79/59           80/62             -1/-3
June 28:              79/57           81/63             -2/-6
June 29:              82/68           81/63            +1/+5
June 30:              87/69           81/63            +6/+6
July 1:                84/68           81/63             +3/+5
July 2:                89/71           81/63             +8/+8
July 3:                87/67           81/63             +6/+4
July 4:                85/65           81/63             +4/+2
July 5:                84/66           82/64             +2/+2
July 6:                78/64           82/64              -4/0
July 7:                79/67           82/64              -3/+3
July 8:                84/66           82/64             +2/+2
July 9:                82/62           82/64                0/-2
July 10:              84/62           82/64              +2/-2
July 11:              83/71           82/64              +1/+7
July 12:              88/72           82/64              +6/+8
July 13:              91/69           83/65              +8/+4
July 14:              66/62           83/65             -17/-3
July 15:              82/64           83/65               -1/-1
July 16:              84/64           83/65              +1/-1
July 17:              82/66           83/65              -1/+1
July 18:              86/70           83/65             +3/+5
July 19:              91/73           83/65             +8/+8
July 20:              92/72           83/65             +9/+7
July 21:              90/76           82/64             +8/+12
July 22:              84/72           82/64             +2/+8
July 23:              78/68           82/64              -4/+4
July 24:              70/60           82/64             -12/-4





-Highest Temperature: 94 degrees on May 18 and June 13
-Lowest Temperature:  39 degrees on May 4
-# of High Temperatures above normal:    43 days      
-# of High Temperatures right at normal:   3 days
-# of High Temperatures below normal:    39 days
 -# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal:   7 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal:  11 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal:    5 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal:    2 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees above normal:    2 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees below normal:    0 days
-# of Highs at or above 100 degrees:   0 days
-# of Highs between 90-99 degrees:    9 days
-# of Highs between 80-89 degrees:  30 days
-# of Highs between 70-79 degrees:  21 days
-# of Highs between 60-69 degrees : 17 days
-# of Highs below 60 degrees: 8 days
-Rainfall: 12.08 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:       31 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:  54 days

Uptick in humidity, storms to erase September-like chill in northeastern US late week

By Kyle Elliott, AccuWeather meteorologist
July 25,2017, 12:06:10PM,EDT
 
 After temperatures more typical of early fall chill the Northeast into midweek, an increase in humidity and warmth will set the stage for another round of thunderstorms and flooding downpours by week’s end.
High temperatures will be stuck in the 60s and 70s through midweek across the northern mid-Atlantic and New England, which is 5 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit below normal for late July.
"Some locations, such as Boston, that had high temperatures in the 90s late last week will not get out of the 60s on Tuesday," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Mike Doll said.
The change in temperatures will be less dramatic in areas farther south in the mid-Atlantic.
Highs will be held in the lower to middle 80s in Washington, D.C., near 80 F in Philadelphia, and in the 70s F in New York City through midweek.
northeast tuesday

For those weary of the recent spell of heat and high humidity in recent weeks, the cooldown will come as welcome relief and paint an ideal picture for outdoor activities such as fishing, hiking, biking and gardening.
The September-like air will also cut down on the high cooling demands that residents of the eastern United States have been facing for the past several weeks.
Residents eager to open up the windows and have fresh air circulate through their homes may get that chance on not one but two nights through midweek.
Static NE Wednesday Plain Language

However, the early taste of fall will be quickly, albeit briefly, swept away as warmth and humidity return by late week.
“Warmer and more humid air will nose in from the Great Lakes on Thursday,” AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Brown said. “While humidity levels will not be as oppressive as they were last week, this uptick in humidity will still be noticeable.”
From the central to the southern mid-Atlantic, temperatures are forecast to return to near-normal levels for late July. Highs will reach the upper 80s at times in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., with highs in lower 80s on tap for New York City.
"A true heat wave, with three days in a row of high temperatures at or above 90 F are not likely in the near future," according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.
For most areas from the northern mid-Atlantic into New England, the most noticeable difference by late week will be the increase in humidity, as the surge of very hot air may get cut off farther south.
Due to the high humidity, AccuWeather ReelFeel® temperatures may surge back into the 90s across the southern mid-Atlantic and middle 80s farther to the north.
While the heat should not reach dangerous levels in most locations, it may force most residents to close the windows and crank up the air conditioning unit yet again.
The resurgence of summer warmth and humidity will also fuel an enhanced risk of showers, thunderstorms and another round of potentially flooding downpours.
Late-week storms 5 am static

“A storm system approaching from the west will spread the threat of wet weather eastward into the mid-Atlantic by Thursday and Friday,” Brown said.
The potential exists for 1-3 inches of rain to fall over similar areas spanning Thursday evening into Friday night, which would only exacerbate ongoing flooding issues and delay recovery efforts.
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Creeks and streams may not have an adequate chance to fall back to normal levels before this additional rainfall causes them to accelerate back out of their banks.
"In addition to the risk of flooding downpours, some of the storms may pack a punch in terms of strong wind gusts from late Thursday to Friday," Sosnowski said.
Once this storm system pushes eastward off the mid-Atlantic coastline by Saturday, another surge of fall-like air and lower humidity should grace the eastern U.S. with sunshine and gorgeous conditions.
“A sprawling area of high pressure pushing southward from Canada can suppress intense summer heat and humidity from New England to the mid-Atlantic into early next week,” Brown added.
In fact, any prolonged periods of heat and humidity may fail to return to the northeastern U.S. through at least the first week or two of August.

10 die after being trapped in sweltering truck at San Antonio Walmart

By Kevin Byrne, AccuWeather staff writer
July 24,2017, 2:38:13PM,EDT
 
 
Authorities uncovered a gruesome scene in San Antonio, Texas, over the weekend when they found eight people dead in the back of a sweltering tractor-trailer at a Walmart parking lot. At least 38 people total had been crammed inside the trailer.
A ninth victim died at a nearby hospital on Sunday, and at least 20 people were hospitalized in ‘dire’ condition due to dehydration and heat stroke, the Associated Press reported. The 10th fatality was confirmed Monday morning, officials told My San Antonio.
In a press conference early Sunday morning, San Antonio Police Chief William McManus called the incident a "horrific tragedy" and said police were investigating a "human-trafficking crime."
McManus added that the driver of the truck was in custody and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security was involved in the investigation.
The AP reported Monday that the driver, James Matthew Bradley Jr., 60, was charged in the deaths of the 10 immigrants and could face the death penalty.
tractor trailer deahts
San Antonio police officers investigate the scene where eight people were found dead in a tractor-trailer loaded with at least 30 others outside a Walmart store in stifling summer heat in what police are calling a horrific human trafficking case, Sunday, July 23,2017, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood said some of the victims were "very hot to the touch" and had been locked in the trailer with no signs of water and the air conditioning was not working.
Highs over the weekend in San Antonio hovered near 100 degrees Fahrenheit, with lows dipping only into the mid-70s.
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Police were alerted to the scene either late Saturday or early Sunday when a person from the truck asked a Walmart employee for some water. The employee then called the police. It’s unclear how long the truck had been parked in the lot, but officials said they were reviewing surveillance video.
"By any standard, the horrific crime uncovered last night ranks as a stark reminder of why human smuggling networks must be pursued, caught and punished," Thoma Homan. acting director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said in a statement on Monday. "These networks have repeatedly shown a reckless disregard for those they smuggle, as today’s case demonstrates.
A similar smuggling case occurred in 2003, in which 19 people were killed near Victoria, Texas. The driver in that case was sentenced to 34 years in prison, the AP reported.

UK: Stormy Wednesday conditions to keep summer warmth at bay


By Eric Leister, AccuWeather meteorologist
July 25,2017, 10:28:37AM,EDT
 
 
A potent storm system will lash the United Kingdom with soaking rain and gusty winds on Wednesday.
Locations from Northern Ireland into northern England and Scotland will face the brunt of the storm with spells of rain and occasional downpours.
Rainfall amounts of 10-20 mm (0.40-0.80 of an inch) will be common with local amounts over 25 mm (1 inch) from Belfast to Edinburgh.
UK 7/24

This amount of rain falling in a short period can result in some localized flooding and slow travel.
While the heaviest downpours will affect northern parts of the country, a few showers will also dampen southern England including Greater London.
Showers will begin late Wednesday morning in London with additional showers lasting into the afternoon. Weather will improve in the evening.
Along with the rainfall, gusty winds will be felt throughout the U.K. on Wednesday.
Frequent gusts of 20-30 mph (32-48 km/h) will accompany the rain, making it feel miserable at times.
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The wind will also make using a brolly difficult at times.
Temperatures will be held in check by this storm system as highs will reach only 17-21 C (62-69 F), continuing a stretch of cool weather throughout the country.
Additional rounds of showers and gusty winds will occur throughout the U.K. on Thursday and Friday; however, no flooding or significant travel disruption is expected.
This active weather pattern is not expected to change anytime soon. Temperatures will be near to below normal into next week.

Soggy,wet,cool Spring leads to soggy,wet,muggy (and relatively cool) Summer. Persistent weather pattern lingers across 2 seasons for Northeastern US and NYC metro-area

A persistent trough in the Jet Stream over the Eastern two-thirds of the US has lingered for going on 4 straight months resulting in above normal rainfall and precipitation amounts since mid-March 2017 and now that it's lingering into the 2017 summer season,the result has been above normal rainfall totals as well as stiflingly humid,muggy conditions in the New York City tristate area in particular. Here are the Temperature and Rainfall stats for the 2017 summer season so far for the city of White Plains,NY,in suburban Westchester County,as of 1:30AM,EDT,July 25,2017 from accuweather.com







June 21:              82/64           79/61            +3/+3
June 22:              85/71           79/61            +6/+10
June 23:              82/72           79/61            +3/+11
June 24:              82/72           80/62            +2/+10
June 25:              81/63           80/62            +1/+1
June 26:              78/58           80/62             -2/-4
June 27:              79/59           80/62             -1/-3
June 28:              79/57           81/63             -2/-6
June 29:              82/68           81/63            +1/+5
June 30:              87/69           81/63            +6/+6
July 1:                 84/68           81/63             +3/+5
July 2:                 89/71           81/63             +8/+8
July 3:                 87/67           81/63             +6/+4
July 4:                 85/65           81/63             +4/+2
July 5:                 84/66           82/64             +2/+2
July 6:                 78/64           82/64              -4/0
July 7:                 79/67           82/64              -3/+3
July 8:                 84/66           82/64             +2/+2
July 9:                 81/63           82/64              -1/-1
July 10:               84/62           82/64             +2/-2
July 11:               83/71           82/64             +1/+7
July 12:               88/72           82/64             +6/+8
July 13:               91/69           83/65             +8/+4
July 14:               66/62           83/65            -17/-3
July 15:               82/64           83/65              -1/-1
July 16:               84/64           83/65             +1/-1
July 17:               82/66           83/65              -1/+1
July 18:               86/70           83/65             +3/+5
July 19:               91/73           83/65             +8/+8
July 20:               92/72           83/65             +9/+7
July 21:               91/75           82/64             +9/+11
July 22:               84/72           82/64             +2/+8
July 23:               78/68           82/64             -4/+4
July 24:               69/61           82/64           -13/-3






-Highest Temperature: 92 degrees on July 20
-Lowest Temperature:  57 degrees on June 28
-# of High Temperatures above normal:   23 days      
-# of High Temperatures right at normal:  0 days
-# of High Temperatures below normal:   11 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal: 0 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal: 2 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal: 0 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal: 1 day       (July 14)
-# of Highs at or above 100 degrees:   0 days
-# of Highs between 90-99 degrees:    4 days
-# of Highs between 80-89 degrees:  22 days
-# of Highs between 70-79 degrees:    6 days
-# of Highs below 70 degrees: 2 days            
-Rainfall: 3.98 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:        12 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:   22 days